It’s a running joke in my family that when I was a little girl I loved powdered donuts. One of those-want what you can’t have type of things. We ate very healthy at home and to this day I still don’t know if I’m allowed to have caffeinated drinks or not. Hey, I don’t make the rules. My mom does. But at the lake?

Free. For. All.

In the summers, we’d go to the lake for the weekend and everyone would unload junk food galore out of his or her cars. Chips. Dips. Suncreen. Boats. And powdered donuts. I’m sure it drove my mom crazy that I would emerge from other boats with my face covered in powdered sugar and surely on some sort of insanity-bound sugar high. Oh well. It was the 90’s. No one worried about artificial colors and if donuts were a “clean food” or not. These days, the "cool" moms would be judging for sure as they unloaded their organic juice pouches and cheddar bunnies.

I still love the lake. I love snacking at the lake. I love bulk-size cheese puffs, which are best, served at the lake. Some things never go out of style. If anything, donuts are making a comeback. We don’t have to rely on basic old flavors anymore either. In an effort to avoid the powdered sugar face on Mr. Mischief, I thought we’d mix it up a bit.

Frosted Apple Donuts.

Healthy, colorful, and cuz they’re for kids: sprinkles. Okay okay. The sprinkles are mostly for me. If it has sprinkles I’m down.

 Frosted Apple Donuts Steps 1-4

Frosted Apple Donuts Steps 1-4

This recipe requires a little bit of set-up sans kiddos. I don’t like using the big kitchen knife with Mischief standing next to me and grabbing ingredients. We started with one apple. I presliced and cored the apple. I did this the night before so they were all ready to go. He also inherited his Daddy’s impatience gene and they don’t like waiting on me. Sometimes I move pretty slowly. I’ll admit it. Easier if I’m one step ahead. We mixed the food coloring with the cream cheese. I chose original flavor cream cheese for our apples however, there are tons of yummy flavors now. You can also add in honey, sugar, or marshmallow fluff to sweeten it up if you like. He chose pink and green for our “frosting” colors. We talked about the changes in color from the addition of the food coloring. Instead of a kitchen knife (to spread),  we used one of my cake decorating spatulas. They aren’t sharp at all and perfect for digging into a frosting cup.

When we made s'mores bars he blew my mind and used sign language to describe one of the ingredients. I thought it’d be fun to build on this and introduced some Spanish vocabulary into #wecookwednesday this week.

Knife=Cuchillo (coo-chee-yo)

He used the cuchillo and spread the frosting on top of the apple. I made sure to emphasize this word and used it over and over.

“Wow, you’re spreading the frosting with the cuchillo.”
“Look at you using the cuchillo in the pink and green colors.”

You get the idea. Use the word at dinner tonight. And tomorrow. They’ll like it.

I facilitated a bit and helped to spread the frosting all over the apples. It could’ve sat at room temp for a little longer I think. Then, the sprinkles started. Sprinkles galore. Love me some sprinkles. I had three different kinds and he mixed and matched all over his apple masterpieces. This recipe was definitely our easiest to date. Frosted apple donuts are so fun and you can get creative as heck with these. Don’t like cream cheese? Peanut butter or Nutella it is! Don’t want sprinkles? Raisins, white chocolate chips, or almonds! Possibilities are endless. If only, we’d had these at the lake when I was a kid. Maybe I wouldn’t have left little white handprints everywhere I went.

 Project-based. Kid-friendly.

Project-based. Kid-friendly.

Early Childhood Lessons:

Spanish vocabulary

-Language Development/Reading

Cause and Effect

-Science

 

Ingredients:

1 apple

1 tub cream cheese

 

Food coloring

Sprinkles 

 

Yield: 6 servings

To Prep:

Slice and core apple to desired size.

 

  • Mix food coloring and cream cheese.
  • Spread cream cheeses onto apple slices.
  • Cover with sprinkles.

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